Category Archives: Richard Stark

The name is Parker …

Who is Parker? Well, he is the elusive protagonist of a series of crime novels by ‘Richard Stark’ (aka Donald Westlake) – we never learn his first name but then Parker is not his real surname anyway. In the second … Continue reading

Posted in Donald Westlake, Film Noir, Parker, Richard Stark | 26 Comments

Payback – Straight Up: The Director’s Cut

When Parker, the Jason Statham / Jennifer Lopez movie was released, they used a rather obscure though witty strapline that only fans would probably enjoy: “Payback has a new name” Why is this amusing? Well it helps if you know that … Continue reading

Posted in 2013 Book to Movie Challenge, Donald Westlake, Film Noir, Parker, Richard Stark | Tagged , | 32 Comments

Top 12 Mystery Movie Remakes

As the movie summer starts to wind down, the sheer number of sequels, remakes and ‘reboots’ certainly can make for a dispiriting summing up. But it is worth remembering that, at least in our genre, there are a great many great … Continue reading

Posted in 'Best of' lists, 'In praise of ...', Chicago, Ernest Hemingway, Film Noir, James M. Cain, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Mexico, Miami, Michael Curtiz, New York, Noir on Tuesday, Parker, Philip Marlowe, Private Eye, Raymond Chandler, Richard Stark, San Francisco, Texas, Top 10, Washington DC | 52 Comments

2013 Book to Movie Challenge

I had promised myself that in 2013 I would not undertake any new Challenges … but this one created over at the Doing Dewey blog was just too tempting – and besides, it’s not New Year yet so if as … Continue reading

Posted in 2013 Book to Movie Challenge, Clive Egleton, Elleston Trevor, Francis Beeding, Harlan Ellison, Michael Crichton, Parker, Philip Marlowe, Raymond Chandler, Richard Matheson, Richard Stark, Ross Thomas, Stanley Ellin | Tagged , , | 22 Comments

BLOOD ON THE MINK (1962) by Robert Silverberg

Counterfeiting is the name of the game in this hardboiled thriller by the legendary Robert Silverberg, one of the busiest writers of the 50 and 60s. Having made his short story debut while still in his teens and getting his … Continue reading

Posted in Charles Ardai, Dashiell Hammett, Film Noir, Friday's Forgotten Book, Hard Case Crime, Philadelphia, Private Eye, Richard Stark, Scene of the crime | 20 Comments

KINDS OF LOVE, KINDS OF DEATH (1966) by Donald Westlake

Donald Edwin Edward Westlake (1933-2008) was a prolific writer and over the decades published all kinds of crime and mystery books – and other types of fiction too – under a great many pseudonyms. Of the dozen or so names … Continue reading

Posted in Donald Westlake, Film Noir, New York, Richard Stark, Scene of the crime | Tagged , | 12 Comments

Top 101 Film & TV Mysteries

This is a minor milestones for Tipping My Fedora as the blog has now reached its 101st post. So, seeing as it is also my birthday today, what better way to celebrate than with a small indulgence in the company of … Continue reading

Posted in 'Best of' lists, Charlie Chan, Columbo, Dashiell Hammett, Dorothy L. Sayers, Film Noir, Giallo, Inspector Morse, Jonathan Latimer, London, Lord Peter Wimsey, Los Angeles, Nero Wolfe, New York, Oxford, Paris, Parker, Philip MacDonald, Philip Marlowe, Philo Vance, Raymond Chandler, Rex Stout, Richard Stark, Robert Culp, Ross Macdonald, San Francisco, Scene of the crime, Scott Turow, Sherlock Holmes, SS Van Dine, The Thin Man, TV Cops, William Goldman | 31 Comments

SONGS OF INNOCENCE by Richard Aleas

Songs of Innocence is published by Hard Case Crime, the imprint founded by Charles Ardai specialising in pulp fiction in the style of the 50s and 60s – the era of the paperback original as delivered by the likes of … Continue reading

Posted in Charles Ardai, Ed McBain, Film Noir, Hard Case Crime, New York, Private Eye, Richard Stark, Scene of the crime | 4 Comments

THE HUNTER (1962) by Richard Stark

The writer protagonist in Stephen King’s The Dark Half, having failed as a literary novelist, uses ‘Stark’ as the pen name for a series of crime books about a killer, which become hugely popular to his growing chagrin. He explains that he … Continue reading

Posted in Donald Westlake, Film Noir, Five Star review, Parker, Richard Stark | 11 Comments

Top 100 mystery books (almost)

The plan was to come up with a top 100 that I was prepared to stand by – but I wanted to re-read so many of the books that I might have included but now remembered too vaguely (such as Ngaio Marsh’s output or books like Tey’s hugely popular The Daughter of Time) that I thought I should publish only a partial list. Not to mention finding it a bit hard to just settle on one book by Georges Simenon given the enormity of his output – I have placed a list of 80+ titles on the site and am extremely open to suggestions …

So here are My (Nearly) Top 100 Mystery Books  Continue reading

Gallery | 2 Comments

Top 10: San Francisco Mysteries

With the closure at the end of this month of The San Francisco Mystery Bookstore (as reported here) I thought I would dedicate a post this week to that fine city in Northern California where, once upon a time, I used to visit a very good friend of mine. I did a lot of growing up there in the 80s and 90s and also bought a lot of great mystery books.

I haven’t been there in over a decade now but along with its undoubtedly beautiful setting on the Bay, the vibrancy of its culture (and counter-culture) and of course the wonderful food, fascinating people and amazing architecture, the potential for squalor and seediness seemed often remarkably ever-present to me as a European tourist, requiring little more than a short step in the ‘wrong’ direction – especially before the regeneration of SOMA. This mixture of high and low culture, of beauty and darkness, have made it the perfect setting for all kinds of mysteries, from the misanthropic romance of Hitckcock’s Vertigo to the hard- and soft-boiled worlds of Hammett found in the gritty adventures of Sam Spade and upper class sleuths Nick and Nora Charles. In some ways the most valuable works here for me are those by Bill Pronzini and the late Joe Gores, who use the city and its environs as the backdrop for so much of their work. They offer a particularly fascinating and diverse look at a city and how it has changed over the decades.

Limiting this list to just 10 inevitably meant plumping for some personal favourites and some unavoidable but great, even classic, books that somehow you just can’t do without. So, for today, these are my top mystery books set in and about San Francisco, still beautiful and mysterious – just like my old friend. I present these in strict chronological order. I hope to blog on each separately, as time goes by … Continue reading

Gallery | 19 Comments